(Source: ForGIFs.com, via cheesegod69)

That’s me.

That’s me.

(Source: tibets, via cheesegod69)

(Source: drycoochie, via cheesegod69)

stevenperhero:

zenpencils:

BILL WATTERSON ‘A cartoonist’s advice’

Yes, the daughter’s outfit in the last few panels probably IS intended to remind you of what it reminds you of.

(Source: zenpencils.com, via tigeryear)

"I’m doing something beautiful."

(Source: j0k3rman, via gaaaaahgkjhgakjg)

I tried to post this on Vine, but it didn’t work. Here you go:

Vine is a really interesting medium because the required brevity really inspires creativity. A large number of users are stepping up to the challenge of creating something new and exciting within the 6-second time limit. I find it interesting that this app has, in some ways, made viewers reevaluate what it means to them to dedicate six seconds of their lives to watching something online. The concept of time is both precious and worthless. Time flies by and stands still all at once. One day you will be too old to function, and the atoms in your body will break apart and form something new, but (hopefully) not before you have time to look back on all your many years and wonder, briefly, where all the time went. I like to post videos of my cat and King of the Hill. Before my time is over, I want to be remembered as someone who lived well.

kirimh:




Alexander Cozens (1717-1786)A Blot: Tigersca. 1770-80Watercolor on paperTate Britain, London



Cozens was one of the forerunners of the “Golden Age” of British watercolor, which initiated in the mid-18th century. Greatly admired by Turner and Girtin, he was one one of the first watercolorists to demonstrate its possibilities as a truly expressive medium. As drawing master at Eton, he had his students practice an exercise wherein paper was blotted with a random application of brown wash. Dark brushstrokes were then applied over it in a way that described the forms suggested by the blots. The exercise was intended to develop his students’ imaginative capabilities with respect to drawing and composition-building. His primary subject was landscape; paintings including figures or animals, like this one, are rare.
These “blot paintings” were fairly trendy in London and Cozens produced many of them over the course of his career. They demonstrate a playful, flexible attitude towards painting and draftsmanship that was atypical amongst successful academic painters. His lyrical brushstrokes almost seem inspired more by East Asian techniques than anything else. Even his highly representational landscapes are imbued with an uncommon, intangible poetry.

kirimh:

Alexander Cozens (1717-1786)
A Blot: Tigers
ca. 1770-80
Watercolor on paper
Tate Britain, London

Cozens was one of the forerunners of the “Golden Age” of British watercolor, which initiated in the mid-18th century. Greatly admired by Turner and Girtin, he was one one of the first watercolorists to demonstrate its possibilities as a truly expressive medium. As drawing master at Eton, he had his students practice an exercise wherein paper was blotted with a random application of brown wash. Dark brushstrokes were then applied over it in a way that described the forms suggested by the blots. The exercise was intended to develop his students’ imaginative capabilities with respect to drawing and composition-building. His primary subject was landscape; paintings including figures or animals, like this one, are rare.

These “blot paintings” were fairly trendy in London and Cozens produced many of them over the course of his career. They demonstrate a playful, flexible attitude towards painting and draftsmanship that was atypical amongst successful academic painters. His lyrical brushstrokes almost seem inspired more by East Asian techniques than anything else. Even his highly representational landscapes are imbued with an uncommon, intangible poetry.

blameaspartame:

“jesus christ is my n****”

Well, I’m convinced!